Rodanthi Tzanelli is Associate Professor of Cultural Sociology at the University of Leeds, UK.

(See my biography page for more information).

Latest weblog entries:

Publications:
Solitary Amnesia as National Memory: From Habermas to Luhmann

The study explores the nature of European national memory, by suggesting a fusion of Habermasian and Luhmanian theory.

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Cultural Intimations and the Commodification of Culture: “Sign Industries” as Makers of the “Public Sphere”

The paper proffers some theoretical reflections on the nature of new cultural industries and the interplay of local, national and global resistances that they induce.

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The Da Vinci Node: Networks of Neo-pilgrimage in the European Cosmopolis

The paper explores how the Da Vinci Code, a novel by Dan Brown, and its cinematic adaptation (2006) operate as a node for European capitalist networks of corporeal-come-virtual travel.

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Ill-Defined ‘Heritage’: Exploring Thessaloniki’s Selective Agenda

The paper reviews Thessaloniki’s definitions of ‘national heritage’, suggesting that they conform to a European Christian cosmology that stresses spirituality while discarding ‘know-how’ cultures and ‘alien’ contributions to Greek identity.

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The Greek Fall: Simulacral Thanatotourism in Europe

The paper explores the socio-cultural dynamics of Greek demonstrations in 2011, suggesting that their function exceeds that of social movements.

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Embodied Art and Aesthetic Performativity in the London Olympics Handover to Rio

I discuss staged performances in the London 2012 handover to Rio as marketable revisions of Brazil’s colonial history that lead to the artistic display of ethnic characters for global audiences.

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Heritage Entropy in New Zealand: The Hobbit (2010) Protests, Film-work, and Post-colonial Cosmology

The paper examines how culturally situated worldviews survive in late modern technological spaces. Against "The Hobbit" protests, it examines how a transnational artistic community used collective memory in its film-making.

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Published online: November 23, 2015

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